Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Nesting Season

ETHICAL DISCLOSURE: These nests were minimally disrupted.  I did not touch the tree with the nest nor move and nor harass the nest or birds.  If Parent Bird was close, I did not approach.  When Parent approached, I ceased my activities and left the scene.  In short, I aimed to respect the space of the birds and their chances at breeding.

Birds breeding powers their migration, courtship rituals, and plumage.  While we may dream about seeing the amazing breeding grounds of the tundra or the rainforest, our local birds aren't too shabby.  We just need to know where to look and how to look.  Finding nests is kind of like finding a pot of gold.  You can get a real intimate view of the bird.  But here are some thoughts on the ethics and moral dilemmas of looking at and photographing Nests.

#1 - Do Not Anger Mom and Pop - Pissing off parents can be a dangerous proposition.  You don't want to scare them off their nesting duties and you don't want to draw attention to the nest.  If you have to make too much motion or commotion, you might really endanger the nest

#2 - Do Not Disturb the Tree/Shrub/Ground - Different birds have different nesting strategies and its important to know them so you don't disturb them.  Knowing where birds like to build their nests also makes it easier to find them!

#3 - Take only Memories - Don't gather a memento of your encounter with a bird nest.  It is against the Migratory Bird Act to take nests and also detrimental to the birds themselves.  

Enjoy the many activities of our breeding feathered friends!  What are your favorite encounters with a nest and breeding birds?  Share in the comments below and until next time!

Northern Flicker in Nest

American Redstart on the Nest


Yellow Warbler Nest

Eastern Phoebe Nest

Linking to Wild Bird Wednesday - Link here

8 comments:

  1. Glad you respected the birds space but these are good shots.

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    1. I try! Thanks for visiting the blog!

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  2. Great series on the birds nest.. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks so much. Nests are truly special

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  3. Love your pictures of future generations!

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  4. Great tips! I wish more wildlife photographers read and understood these tips. I'd add....never share with unknown people where nesting sites are located. Especially sensitive species like owls, etc.

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    1. Me too! Its too often that I see the odd photographer (and it is the minority of them) who sacrifice the safety of the bird for the shot. It is very disappointing.

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